Opposing Views

6 12 2010

The World War II Memorial in Washington, DC has been one of my favorite places to photograph. The memorial is large and it has unique architecture incorporating fountains and pools. It is a great place to people watch or to just enjoy being in the heart of Washington.

During a visit to the memorial in April, I capture a photograph that grows on me more each time I look at it. The shot focuses on opposites. There is a young child and an older veteran. Excitement of a fountain versus quiet reflection for those the fountain was built for. The two people are on opposite sides of the water, much like they are on opposite ends of life.While the image deals a lot with opposites it also reminds me of the wide range of ages, people, and emotions that can often be seen at this memorial.

You may view other images from America’s capital in my Washington, DC gallery.

  • Opposing Views - WWII MemorialTwo of America’s finest reflecting on their emotions at the World War II Memorial in Washington, DC




  • Visiting Jefferson’s Treasures

    26 02 2010

    “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.” ~Thomas Jefferson~

    This quote seems to fit my photography pretty well. As I have focused more time and energy on photography, I continue to find better “luck.” It’s also a polite way of saying don’t just sit around and wait for things to happen.

    Last weekend I spent part of a day in Charlottesville, VA while my wife spent the afternoon at a conference. I burned a few hours by visiting two of Thomas Jefferson’s historical locations. I was able to visit Monticello for the first time and tour Thomas Jefferson’s home. While the grounds were snow-covered it was still enjoyable to walk around. I was pleasantly surprised by the time I spent there. I thought that I would just be seeing an old house, but I good tour guide re-sparked an interest in the history nerd that lives inside me. The architecture of the building was also very unique and made for some good shots.

    I also visited the center of the University of Virginia’s campus and took in the Academical Village and the Rotunda. As a college administrator, I found this area both unique and amazing. I have to admit that one of the first thoughts I had as I walked a corridor along student residences was “isn’t a fireplace a significant fire hazard”. The Academical Village is Jefferson’s idea of a university. It is a place where faculty, staff, and students closely interact benefiting the educational experience of the student. The Rotunda, which is the central building of UVA’s campus, is a great building. I will share some photographs that focus on this building in another post.

    Here are a few more photos from my afternoon:

    Jefferson’s thoughts also seem to provide a good life lesson. Hard work yields results. And while I do believe that luck does exist, effort leads to more positive outcomes. You’re probably better off putting in a little effort instead of just hoping things break your way!

    To view more photos from Virginia, please click on any of the images in this post. My gallery of Virginia is a new project. I still have many places to explore.





    Lost in Time

    23 02 2010

    It is rare that in 2010 that someone is able to capture an”urban” environment in a state that  could have come out of any of the past 50 years. I was able to find this scene earlier this month. Annapolis was still digging out from the 2nd of back to back blizzards.  This scene was captured along Fleet and Cornhill Streets among some historic homes. While the streets were plowed once, they were still covered in deep snow that made driving fairly difficult for the 1 car I saw drive down the road. Outside of a couple of cars buried in the snow, it’s difficult to place a time stamp on this shot.

    Feel free to view additional photos from Annapolis, MD by clicking on the image.





    New Gallery – Annapolis, MD

    12 01 2010

    I have lived in the Washington, DC area for more than five years. Last weekend, I began to finally photograph Annapolis. I walked around the historic sections of the city on a cold windy day that provided some good sky conditions for some of my photographs. The resulting photos make up the beginning of a gallery that I hope to expand over the coming months. Feel free to check out my Annapolis, MD gallery by clicking any of the photos below.

    The historic Annapolis skyline taken from City Dock.

    I found a cold windy winter day to be a good day to try to photograph the city. There were very few people  around. It was nice not having to trip over others to find a spot to take a photo. As I expand the gallery, I hope to take some more shots around sunrise (ha) or sunset. And hopefully some at night as well.

    The Maryland State House in Annapolis, MD.

    St. Paul's Episcopal Church located in the historic circle of Annapolis.

    While I was walking around Annapolis, I also took some time to visit the campus of the United States Naval Academy. While photos from the Academy can be seen in the gallery (by clicking any of the images above), I also posted some of my favorites in a previous post.





    12 Significant Photos: #4 – Dawn at the Capitol

    21 10 2009

    The day after Christmas in Washington, DC was both cold and quiet. I took my wife to work early in the morning so that we could get on the road out of town after her shift. Her shift started before sunrise, so I was able to get to the Capitol before it was light.

    There were not many people around. Just a men’s group out for a morning walk. I decided that I would take some shots of the Capitol from front (west front, sun behind) and center.

    The reflecting pool in front was partially frozen, creating a unique reflection that ranged from mirrored to blurred. The sun rose behind the Capitol Building and lit up the sky and the reflection. The resulting shot is one of my favorites that might be out of place as #4 in my list.

    The U.S. Capitol, located in Washington, DC, at sunrise in December 2008.

    The U.S. Capitol, located in Washington, DC, at sunrise in December 2008.





    Wait for a Photography Tip

    18 10 2009

    Last weekend I was at the U.S. Capitol looking to get some decent shots as the sun began to set.  My goal was catch a shot of the Capitol (from the east front) with a lit up sky behind it. It was a cloudy day that was breaking; the kind of day that often produces something dramatic at sunset. I got to the Capitol and found my spots, but was disappointed to find that clouds had gathered blocking the sunset and what I thought would be potential color.

    I left the east front somewhat disappointed with the shots I had taken. Nothing post worthy. I headed to the west front to figure out what to do with the rest of the evening. I was sitting along the reflecting pool by the Capitol facing the building. There was a fair number of tourits due to the comfortable weather and long (Columbus Day) weekend. When I turned around, I was greeted by what I was waiting for:

    The light of the golden hour lit the sky. The sun had already set below the clouded horizon, but after a few minutes the sun spread its color over the western side of Washington, DC.

    So to get to the photography tip, don’t give up on light. Wait for the light. It’s called the golden hour for a reason. Not because it’s always an hour, but because the time that the sky lights up varies from day to day.

    The photos above and other new images can also be seen at New Additions. Feel free to view other photos from Washington, DC.





    12 Significant Photos: #11

    18 02 2009

    A little over a year ago, I purchased a wide-angle lens for my camera. The lens, a Sigma 10-20mm, is one that I really enjoy shooting with because of the unique perspectives it can help me capture. During my first day out with the lens, I was able to visit the U.S. Capitol Building and the surrounding area. The day was rather dreary, which led to a great shot of the United States Supreme Court Building.

    The U.S. Supreme Court on a cloudy day.

    The U.S. Supreme Court on a cloudy day.

    The Supreme Court is often a quieter location to visit in DC. This leads to the opportunity to get many photos without people climbing the stairs looking around. The wide angle lens allowed me to capture the large approach to the building. I felt that the sky and the overall contrast of the image led to a great opportunity for black and white, which seems to feed the mood of this image.

    Here are some additional photos of Washington, DC.