Gallery Additions – National Cathedral

8 12 2010

I took advantage of a day off today and spent a little bit of time exploring the National Cathedral in Washington, DC. The photos were added to my gallery that has photos of the National Cathedral and the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception (also in Washington, DC). The new photos make up the majority of “page 2” in the gallery. My photos from today focused on the stained glass windows in the cathedral and a few HDR shots of the building. A few examples are available below. Clicking on them will take you to the full gallery.

An HDR image of St. Joseph of Arimathea Chapel in the National Cathedral.

A statue of Abraham Lincoln with a quote.

An HDR view of the interior of the National Cathedral.

An abstract view of a stained glass window.

 

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Photography Tip – Look Up

28 02 2010

In my previous post, I shared a photo of the dome ceiling at the University of Virginia’s Rotunda. That got me to thinking about another similar shot. Apparently I enjoy taking photos of domes. The photo below was taken in the Chapel on the campus of the U.S. Naval Academy. This led me to recall a photography tip that I read about a few years ago.

A lot of things happen over our heads. Some things are man made and others are natural. The ceiling in my living room has a ceiling fan and a textured finish. A textured finish isn’t put on a ceiling for anything more than being pleasant to the eye. In more complex buildings ceilings include domes, arches, lines, and curves. All of these are things often appealing to the eye. In nature trees grow over us and clouds float by. For some people jokes exist in a realm above the head. And if you don’t get what that means, I’m talking about you. Regardless of where you are, many opportunity for good photographs exist above our heads.

All of that being said, it’s very easy to forget to look up. Most of the things we look at do not require much tilt of the head and neck. Whether you’re clicking photos with an iPhone, a point-and-shoot camera, or something more complex look up and see what your options are. Give your neck some exercise!





Raising the Bar in Jefferson’s Rotunda

27 02 2010

Thomas Jefferson designed the early phases of the University of Virginia to place the student body in close proximity to the library and members of the academic community. At the center of Jefferson’s Academical Village is the Rotunda. The building is a symbol of the University of Virgina and is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The building is best known for its dome and columns; it was based on the Pantheon in Rome.

I gave myself a quick tour of the Rotunda and enjoyed the history and architecture of the building. It was an enjoyable building to tour because there we not many people around. The lack of people made it easy to get some good photographs of the building’s interior. The photos below are among my favorite from the past weekend and of the year so far.

These stairs lead up to the dome room. I really like the symmetry, lines, and curves of this shot.

I like how this image shows the shape of the room and the unique architecture of the columns. Again, solid symmetry.

I was able to use a wide angle lens to capture the seating arrangement of the Dome Room with the Skylight in the dome ceiling. The sun was also shining through to add some pattern to the shot.

This shot was taken looking at the skylight in the dome. The sun was shining through onto the dome creating a unique pattern. The image reminds me of a jellyfish.

My sister commented on a previous post and said that I was raising the bar. While I appreciate compliments that people share, I am often critical of my own work. But this is one case where I would agree by saying that these photographs are among my better shots. I guess I am raising the bar.





United States Naval Academy Chapel

9 01 2010

Last weekend, I explored Annapolis, MD on a cold windy day. I walked through the campus of the United States Naval Academy and visited the chapel. It is a beautiful building and it’s a very powerful experience to visit. There are times that pictures do a better job of speaking than we can so I’m going to let this post be one of those times.

U.S. Naval Academy Chapel

U.S. Naval Academy Chapel - Altar and Dome

U.S. Naval Academy Chapel Dome

U.S. Naval Academy Chapel





Lesser Known Places – A.N.C.

19 10 2009

The Memorial Amphitheater at Arlington National Cemetery is one of the lesser known “landmarks” in the Washington, DC area. Its unique architecture and white stone make it an interesting photography subject.

Memorial Amphitheater at Arlington National Cemetery (Arlington, VA)

Memorial Amphitheater at Arlington National Cemetery (Arlington, VA)

Feel free to view other photos from Arlington National Cemetery.





12 Significant Photos: #11

18 02 2009

A little over a year ago, I purchased a wide-angle lens for my camera. The lens, a Sigma 10-20mm, is one that I really enjoy shooting with because of the unique perspectives it can help me capture. During my first day out with the lens, I was able to visit the U.S. Capitol Building and the surrounding area. The day was rather dreary, which led to a great shot of the United States Supreme Court Building.

The U.S. Supreme Court on a cloudy day.

The U.S. Supreme Court on a cloudy day.

The Supreme Court is often a quieter location to visit in DC. This leads to the opportunity to get many photos without people climbing the stairs looking around. The wide angle lens allowed me to capture the large approach to the building. I felt that the sky and the overall contrast of the image led to a great opportunity for black and white, which seems to feed the mood of this image.

Here are some additional photos of Washington, DC.





12 Signficant Photographs

12 02 2009

“Twelve significant photographs in any one year is a good crop.” ~Ansel Adams~

Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, DC

Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, DC

Ansel Adams’ quote about 12 significant photographs focused on the time frame of a year. For the purpose of blogging and sharing some of my favorite work, I’m going to begin a countdown of my 12 significant photographs. These 12 photographs will be a ranking of my favorites over my time in photography. I’ll start a countdown from #12 and see where it goes.

I have used this quote to shape how I display my favorite photographs. I select 12 photos from each year. You can feel free to visit that work here.