Opposing Views

6 12 2010

The World War II Memorial in Washington, DC has been one of my favorite places to photograph. The memorial is large and it has unique architecture incorporating fountains and pools. It is a great place to people watch or to just enjoy being in the heart of Washington.

During a visit to the memorial in April, I capture a photograph that grows on me more each time I look at it. The shot focuses on opposites. There is a young child and an older veteran. Excitement of a fountain versus quiet reflection for those the fountain was built for. The two people are on opposite sides of the water, much like they are on opposite ends of life.While the image deals a lot with opposites it also reminds me of the wide range of ages, people, and emotions that can often be seen at this memorial.

You may view other images from America’s capital in my Washington, DC gallery.

  • Opposing Views - WWII MemorialTwo of America’s finest reflecting on their emotions at the World War II Memorial in Washington, DC




  • Golden Gate Bridge

    5 12 2010

    I’m just one in a long line of people that wanted to take photos of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco.  I had my first opportunity in early October when visiting the area with family. I didn’t take a lot of time to shoot the bridge, but did take a few minutes from a few different perspectives. While San Francisco didn’t offer much in the way of sunshine when near the bridge, I did have the opportunity to work with some good conditions. A couple of my favorite shots are posted below. Additional photos from my time in the San Francisco area can be seen in my Sights of San Francisco gallery.

    Golden Gate Bridge and Fog - Color

    The fog started to roll in around the bridge as I arrived with my camera.

    Golden Gate Bridge with Wave

    Baker Beach provided a unique perspective of the bridge with some active waves on the shore.

    Golden Gate Bridge Long Exposure

    Big waves are slowed down by a slower shutter speed.

    Looking at the Golden Gate Bridge

    A view of the bridge with a person viewing the bridge.

     





    Views from Alcatraz Prison

    4 12 2010

    Alcatraz prison was far smaller than I imagined it to be.  And not nearly as remote as the stories of failed escape attempts would lead you to believe. While touring the former prison, I was able to capture two shots of views from inside the prison. The first is through a window looking out at activity on the water. The second photo (HDR) was taken in the yard; a view not likely to be seen by a prison inmate.

    View from Inside Alcatraz

    A view from inside Alcatraz looking through a dirty window frame.

     

    This is a view from the Alcatraz yard into the bay.

     





    Maui Landscapes – Road to Hana Part 1

    11 07 2010

    I had the opportunity to visit Maui for the second time in May. The island provides a great blend of luxurious resorts, quiet beaches, golf, and opportunity for adventure. From a landscape photography perspective, there are scenic beaches, small towns, rugged coastline, mountains, and opportunities to watch the sun rise or set.

    Toward the end of our visit, my wife and I drove one of the scenic byways on the island. We traveled the “Road to Hana” which is a 50 mile road with hundreds of curves, more than 50 one lane bridges, and numerous narrow passes. Along the road, there are excellent views of Maui’s coast, the ocean, valleys, and waterfalls.

    Two of my favorite landscapes from the trip were captured along this road. You may see them below. Additional photos from our trip to Maui can be seen here.

    Akoi Island is along the coast of Maui.

    Haipuaena Falls along the Road to Hana in Maui





    4th of July – Sandy Point State Park

    6 07 2010

    A sunrise trip to Sandy Point State park didn’t allow for true sunrise photos, but was not a lost cause. The park did not open until about 3 minutes after sunrise and a long line of visitors looking to get 4th of July celebrations set up were ahead of me. The early morning provided strong light and comfortable temperatures. Check out a couple summer Maryland landscapes!

    Chesapeake Bay Bridge from the Sandy Point Beach.

    Sandy Point Shoal Lighthouse in the early morning light.

    A fisherman's setup at the Bay Bridge.





    Photography Tip – Don’t Take Scenes for Granted

    1 03 2010

    My photography tip or thought for the day has to do with taking a scene for granted. Long story short, when you’re looking at a scene, keep in mind that you may be able to get “that” photograph again. For a short story made longer, read on:

    I first saw the barn in the photo below about 5 years ago. It’s located just off of Georgetown Pike (Northern Virginia) on the way to Great Falls National Park. I thought that it was an interesting photo subject but there was no where to park. I drove past the bard about 2-3 times a year for the next 4 years. Every time I visited Great Falls I thought about how I could get a photo or two of it. Eventually this past fall I sucked it up. I pulled my car off of the road and parked in some high grass. It was probably a spot that had no business being parked on. Anyone that has driven this road can probably picture the lack of “pull off” parking. I walked about 100 yards to the opening in the tree line that allowed me to capture the shot below.

    Why do I tell you all of this? Well a few weeks ago, I took a drive to Great Falls shortly after the back to back blizzards (B^3 would have been a clever name). It was a day that there certainly no where to stash a car off of the side of the road because of 4 snow plowed embankments. I was curious to see the barn in a winter like scene as I had never gone to Great Falls with snow on the ground. As I approached the barn, I saw that the scene was no more. The roof had collapsed under the weight of the snow and I would guess that the barn will be demolished in the near future.

    So with this photo of a barn in mind, I suggest taking a photograph of a good scene when you find one because it might not always be there for the taking.





    Photography Tip – Look Up

    28 02 2010

    In my previous post, I shared a photo of the dome ceiling at the University of Virginia’s Rotunda. That got me to thinking about another similar shot. Apparently I enjoy taking photos of domes. The photo below was taken in the Chapel on the campus of the U.S. Naval Academy. This led me to recall a photography tip that I read about a few years ago.

    A lot of things happen over our heads. Some things are man made and others are natural. The ceiling in my living room has a ceiling fan and a textured finish. A textured finish isn’t put on a ceiling for anything more than being pleasant to the eye. In more complex buildings ceilings include domes, arches, lines, and curves. All of these are things often appealing to the eye. In nature trees grow over us and clouds float by. For some people jokes exist in a realm above the head. And if you don’t get what that means, I’m talking about you. Regardless of where you are, many opportunity for good photographs exist above our heads.

    All of that being said, it’s very easy to forget to look up. Most of the things we look at do not require much tilt of the head and neck. Whether you’re clicking photos with an iPhone, a point-and-shoot camera, or something more complex look up and see what your options are. Give your neck some exercise!