Photography on Display – Living Social – 918 F Street – Washington, DC

31 05 2012

Visit 918 F Street on Facebook!

I was recently approached by staff of Living Social to display some of my photography at their new facility on 918 F Street in Washington, DC.  The building is a recently rennovated historic building that will be used by the company as an event space for a variety of purposes and as a home to some of their offices. I’ll get more into the building and its uses in a moment.

The Living Social staff was looking for artwork that displayed Washington, DC and was created by local artists to help make the new facility reflective of its surroundings. After talking with their staff, we decided on three photographs from my Washington, DC Gallery.

When I dropped off my artwork, I had the opportunity to tour the building. Living Social describes the facility as “a downtown space dedicated to hosting unique local experiences and bringing the best of DC to life.” They do this by creating various rooms in the building that will serve a variety of purposes. There is space for pop-up restaurants, cooking classes with popular chefs, art classes, and 2-level bar/club space that can host musicians or other performers. The building also has a large reception area to greet guests that have come to events at 918 F. A multi-purpose room provides additional space in the building to meet almost any need. All of the spaces are outfitted with the newest of modern technologies.

While I have not yet been able to attend an event here, it seems that there are a lot of great options. Interested participants can sign up for experiences at 918 F by buying tickets much like you would for any other deal that Living Social offers. A listing of events is available online.

The photographs I have on display are prints of the images below:

Printed 16″x24″ with 3″ white matting in black frame.

Printed 16″x32″ with 3″ white matting in black frame.

Printed 16″x24″ with 3″ white matting in black frame.

 
Below are two photos that show my artwork, which will be on display at Living Social – 918 F Street until the end of August:

Two of my photographs on display at 918 F Street.

My 3rd photograph on display at 918 F Street.

An article in the Washington Business Journal from February 2012 provides a more formal overivew of 918 F Street. Revolution.com also posted an article about the building.
 




Now it’s Melford

15 03 2012

I’ve lived in Bowie, MD for approximately 5 years. Just a 2 minute drive from my house is a business development that was called the Maryland Science and Technology Center. The development includes a variety of buildings that all appear only partially filled. The only business I encountered that was based here was Terminex. The appearance of empty buildings all around never peeked my interest enough to go see what was there.

The complex recently changed it’s name to Melford. This name change was surprising since I was under the impression that nothing really happened in this business development anyway. It led me to see if I could find why the name changed. While I didn’t find the answer to that question, I did learn that the property was formerly a plantation named Melford. I guess it was a change to become more historic. I also learned that the plantation house was still intact, which led me to go take a look.

The Melford plantation house is in nice condition from the exterior. A few smaller structures are also on the property. The house sits in a wooded area atop a hill in the middle of the business park. It can’t be seen until you actually drive into the park to find it. There isn’t enough here to make a long journey to see it, but it seems to be a hidden treasure and I’d recommend visiting it if you live locally.

Melford Plantation House

Old Plantation House in Maryland.

Melford Plantation - Slave House Door

The door to the small house (hut) believed to be used by slaves.

Melford Plantation House

Melford house from another angle.





National Cherry Blossom Festival…[updated]

12 03 2012

…these words strike fear into the locals. Long lines on the Metro. Restaurants that are packed. People shoulder to shoulder around the tidal basin. With that being said, the festival is a big event that is loved by many.

The National Cherry Blossom Festival is a celebration of the relationship between Japan and the United States (you know, the good parts of it) that started with hundreds of cherry trees being sent from Tokyo to Washington, D.C. in the early 1900s. It attracts visitors from all around the world that take over the District of Columbia for a few weeks each spring.

The blossoms are a sight to see. Early morning (sunrise) is a great time to see the blossoms. The weather is cool, downtown isn’t year crowded, and the light is beautiful. I’d recommend it to anyone willing to crawl out of bed while it’s still dark to get down to the Tidal Basin. The cherry blossoms are expected to be at peak bloom from March 20-23 March 24-28, 2012; early this year due to the mild “winter”.

Below are a few photos of the Tidal Basin that I’ve taken during previous visits to see the cherry blossoms. You may also view other photos from Washington, D.C .by visiting my Washington, D.C. gallery.

Washington Monument at Sunrise - Cherry Blossoms

Sunrise at the Tidal Basin

Sunrise at the Washington Monument

Abstract sunrise

Sunrise at the Jefferson Memorial - Cherry Blossoms

Sunrise at the Jefferson Memorial

Cherry Blossoms and the Washington Monument

Early morning light with the Washington Monument





Maryland State House – Annapolis in 2012

11 03 2012

Most people that visit Annapolis, MD recognize the State House and the iconic wooden dome as the most identifiable landmark in the city. It’s the oldest state capitol that has been in continuous use. Over the past two weeks, I’ve been able to spend some time in Annapolis and captured a few shots that include this icon. You can see other recent additions from Annapolis by clicking on any of the images.

Maryland State House at Night

Maryland State House from State Circle

Annapolis Sunset

Annapolis Sunset across the water.

Maryland State House and Rooftoops

State House Dome with historic rooftops.





Wait Your Turn

9 12 2010

While visiting Maui in May, my wife and I spent a day driving the Road to Hana. It’s a great drive, unless you get nauseous. For a while, I thought that she would just say she didn’t feel well when we were out taking photos (read “while I was out taking photos and she was along for the ride”) and was tired of stop and go driving. After a few trips out sight-seeing, we learned that she doesn’t do well on windy roads. But enough of the side story; car-sickness or not, driving to Hana along the north coast of Maui is an unforgettable ride. There are great views of the ocean, cliffs, beaches, and a few small towns along way. We enjoyed the adventure of exploring Maui.

During our day out, we stopped at Waianapanapa State Park to check out the black sand beach and the surrounding lava shelves. While there, we walked through a beach cave that led to the ocean. As we walked through the cave, I took my camera out to take some photos. When we got to the end, we came across a boy that was looking at the water. You couldn’t continue through the ocean side without getting pounded by the waves. In my mind, I wanted a photo of the cave and ocean; I had no real inspiration to have a person in the photo. But as I patiently waited for my “turn” at the front of the cave, I decided to snap a shot or two using him as a subject. The resulting photo is posted below. Taking a few moments to wait and get the photo I wanted actually provided the opportunity to take what turned out to be a significantly stronger photograph (at least in my opinion).

When we turned around to leave the cave, we found about 25 people in one of the larger areas. As we approached the exit, we found that it started to rain fairly hard and people came to the cave for cover. We decided to make a run for the car and wait out the short shower there.

Additional photos from Maui and Waianapanapa State Park can be seen in my gallery named Maui: The Valley Isle – 2010.

Watching the Water

A boy watching the ocean through a beach cave at Wai'anapanapa State Park in Maui (Hawaii).





Gallery Additions – National Cathedral

8 12 2010

I took advantage of a day off today and spent a little bit of time exploring the National Cathedral in Washington, DC. The photos were added to my gallery that has photos of the National Cathedral and the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception (also in Washington, DC). The new photos make up the majority of “page 2″ in the gallery. My photos from today focused on the stained glass windows in the cathedral and a few HDR shots of the building. A few examples are available below. Clicking on them will take you to the full gallery.

An HDR image of St. Joseph of Arimathea Chapel in the National Cathedral.

A statue of Abraham Lincoln with a quote.

An HDR view of the interior of the National Cathedral.

An abstract view of a stained glass window.

 





Tree Burst

7 12 2010

In a previous post, I provided a photography tip. I suggested the importance of looking up and seeing what’s above your head. While visiting Muir Woods outside of San Francisco, I found a great opportunity to take my own advice. I used a wide-angle lens and created the HDR image seen below. The long lines formed by the tree trunks, the bright light of the sky, and the distant branches work together to create a fairly abstract image.

Muir Woods - Looking Up - Electric

A photo looking toward the sky at Muir Woods near San Francisco, CA.

For more photos from Muir Woods, please visit my Sights of San Francisco gallery.








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